Cowdray House, Midhust, West Sussex title banner, a history of a magnificent 16th Cent house, destroyed by fire in the late 18th Cent
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Eastern Rage - Porch, Buck Hall, and Dining Parlour

Plan of principle rooms of east rangePorch
Tthe porch is nearly square with a beautifully carved fan vault ceiling of stone. In the centre is the Tudor rose with a crown and arounding this are carved eight cusped quatrefoils. In the corners the fans are each divided into four sections, in which alternate a large anchor and a trefoil bearing the letters, W.S., referring to the builder, William, Earl of Southampton. Also, among the spandrels of the south-wet corner fan, there are four heads; two are obviously cherubim, while the others are that of a mature man and woman. Possibly, it had been suggested, that of the Earl and his Countess.

The Buck Hall
The hall was one of the noblest rooms in England, built somewhat in the style of the halls at Hampton Court and Christ Church, Oxford. It was 60ft long, 28ft wide and 60ft from the paved marble floor to the apex of the great hammer beam roof.

Along the north, east and west walls ran very high panelled wainscoting of cedar, on which were fine paintings. Above this, on the west side, are three windows with steeply slopping sills and further to the north, the great bay window with its sixty openings, which flanked the dais that ran across the north end of the hall. Around the walls, above the wainscoting, were large brackets upon which were mounted eleven life size wooden bucks which gave the hall its name. The bucks were the work of Sir Anthony Browne (1542-1548) being part of his family crest.

The high-pitched hammer beam oak roof was divided into four bays.

Dining Parlour
Returning back through the hallway, past the staircase, you enter the Great Parlour, which was renamed as the Dining Parlour in the seventeenth century. Today it looks like an extension to the Buck Hall because most of the dividing wall has fallen. The room was 40 foot long by 21 foot wide and at its west end was a large seventeenth-century bay window.

Compilation pre-fire and modern views of easter range
Easter Range
Porch
Pre-Fire Buck Hall
Pre-Fire Buck Hall
Compilation pre-fire and modern views of eastern range
Porch
Porth Roof
Pre-Fire Buck Hall
Auriel Window
Buck Hall windows
Auriel & Dining Parlour windows
Dining Parlour
Windows
Auriel Window
Buck Hall windows
Dining Parlour
Windows

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