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Appendix II

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF OWNERS, BUILDINGS AND EVENTS.

1160

About 1160, Geldwin Fitz Savaric built a set of buildings in a walled enclosure in top of St. Ann's Hill. Through marriage the site became the property of Frank de Bohun in 1187

1273-84

Between 1273-84, Sir John Bohun built another house on the site of the present ruins of Cowdray. Not much is known about it and no trace remains

1311-15

The earlier Bohun house on St. Ann's Hill was destroyed

1492

The Bohun family died out and through marriage the house became the property of Sir David Owen

1520-29

The Bohun house was pulled down by Sir David Owen and he started to build Cowdray. He built the hall, dining parlour and room above, the two-storied block beyond, the chapel, buttery and pantry and also the kitchen tower, north range and half the west front

1529

Henry Owen sold Cowdray over his father's head to William FitzWilliam for 2,000, though his father was allowed to stay there until his death in 1535

1535

After Sir David Owen's death, Sir William FitzWilliam took residence at Cowdray and with a special licence from Henry VIII to empark and fortify the house; he built the porch, south range and gatehouse

1537

Sir William was created Earl of Southampton and afterwards received many visits from Henry VIII

1539

After a further visit by Henry VIII, the Earl put the Royal oat of arms over the porch, extended the chapel and made several additions to Cowdray

1542

Sir William FitzWilliam died and the estates passed to his half-brother, Sir Anthony Browne

1548

On Sir Anthony's death, his son, also called Anthony, inherited Cowdray

1554

Queen Mary bestows the title of Viscount Montague on Sir Anthony Browne

1591

Queen Elizabeth I spent a week at Cowdray

1592

First Viscount died and the Second Viscount Montague took over. He built the large bays on the northeast side of the court and drew up a book of household rules

1629

Third Viscount Montague took possession

1643-44

The Civil War in England meant that the house and estates were taken over and in 1644 all the plate and treasure was seized and sold. At one point Cowdray was under threat of demolition, but fortunately it was saved, though much damage was done while it was occupied by troops

1682

Fourth Viscount Montague took over. He decorated the chapel

1708

Fifth Viscount Montague

1717

Sixth Viscount Montague made many alterations to windows and doors throughout Cowdray

1767

Seventh Viscount Montague

1787

Eighth Viscount Montague takes over

1793

September 24th, Cowdray is destroyed by fire and at the beginning of October, the Eighth Viscount is drowned. The title of Ninth Viscount Montague went to the second brother, though he did not own the house

1797

Estate when to William Stephen Poyntz, by marriage. He moved into the enlarged keepers lodge in the park

1843

After Mr. Poyntz death, his daughters sold the estate for 300,000 to the Sixth Earl of Egmont

1873

The Seventh Earl of Egmont took over and pulled down the keepers lodge and replaced it with a much large building

1897

Eighth Earl of Egmont took over

1908

Eighth Earl sold the Cowdray estates to Sir Weetman Dickinson Pearson, bart., who in 1910 became Baron Cowdray of Midhurst and in 1917, Viscount Cowdray. It his he who saved the ruins from any more neglect

1927

The Second Viscount Cowdray inherited the estates

1933

Third Viscount Cowdray inherits estates from his father

1995

Forth Viscount Cowdray inherits estates


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